Thursday, June 28, 2001

azcentral.com Internet & Business Expo
(Thursday, July 26, 2001)


The 5th Annual azcentral.com Internet Business Expo presented by AZSoft.net will take place this July 26 & 27, 2001 at Phoenix Civic Plaza. The Expo will feature companies from the Internet, software and telecommunication industries and is expected to attract over 100 exhibitors.

AZSoft.net members will receive $100 off each 10 x 10 area they reserve for the Expo. For more information contact Rich Ripley at 480-491-8373, email:info@azinco.com or go to the Expo web site at www.azinco.com.


http://www.childrensdefense.org/states/data-az.htm

State of Arizona's Children • 2000


ARIZONA'S NATIONAL RANKINGS

With 1 being the best and 51 being the worst:

Arizona ranks 51st in the percentage of children without health insurance. 1996-1998
Arizona ranks 49th in the percentage of babies born to mothers who received early prenatal care. 1997
Arizona ranks 24th in infant mortality. 1997
Arizona ranks 16th in the percentage of low birthweight births. 1997
Arizona ranks 48th in child immunizations for two-year-olds. 1999
Arizona ranks 39th in the percentage of children in poverty. 1996
Arizona ranks 40th in its lowest fair market rent as a percentage of the minimum wage. 2000
Arizona ranks 47th in its child support enforcement. 1997
Arizona ranks 48th in per pupil expenditures in the public schools. 1995-1996
ENSURING EVERY ARIZONA CHILD A HEALTHY START

In Arizona, 356,000 children have no health insurance (25.9 percent of children under age 19) in 1996 - 1998. Nationally, 11.9 million are uninsured (15.6 percent of children under age 19) in 1998.
Arizona ranks 51st in the percentage of children without health insurance. 1996-1998
In Arizona, Medicaid and KidsCare (the state CHIP program) cover children through age 18 up to 200 percent of the poverty level ($28,300 per year for a family of three).
12-Month Continuous Eligibility: CHIP: YES MEDICAID: NO
Presumptive Eligibility: CHIP: NO MEDICAID: NO
As of June 2000, Arizona had an estimated $77.6 million unspent Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) funds from its FY 1998 allotment.
Arizona ranks 49th in the percentage of babies born to mothers who received early prenatal care (75.4 percent). Nationally, 82.5 percent of babies are born to mothers who received early prenatal care. 1997
Arizona ranks 16th in the percentage of low birthweight births (6.9 percent). Nationally, the percentage is 7.5 percent. 1997
Arizona ranks 24th in infant mortality (7.1 infant deaths per 1,000 live births), compared to 7.2 per 1,000 nationally. 1997
Arizona ranks 48th in child immunizations for two-year-olds (72.4 percent). Nationally, the percentage is 78.4 percent. 1999
Arizona’s teen birth rate is 69.7 per 1,000 females ages 15 – 19. Nationally, the rate is 52.3 per 1,000. 1997
ENSURING EVERY ARIZONA CHILD A HEAD START

In Arizona, 58.3 percent of mothers with children under 6 and 73.9 percent of mothers with children ages 6 to 17 are in the labor force. Nationally, 59.7 percent of mothers with children under 6 and 75 percent of mothers with children ages 6 to 17 are in the labor force. 1990
Only Arizona families with annual incomes below $22,908 for a family of three qualify for child care help. Federal law allows the state to serve families with annual incomes up to $32,153. 1999
In Arizona, child care for a four-year-old in a child care center in an urban area averages $4,188 per year, more than the cost of public college tuition in the state — $2,009. 1998
11,127 Arizona children were served by Head Start in 1999. In the 50 states plus the District of Columbia, 729,729 children were served in 1999.
In Arizona, a single caregiver in a center can care for as many as 15 four-year-olds. 1998
Arizona does not require providers in child care centers to have any early childhood training before serving children.
Child care workers in Arizona earn an average annual income of $13,850. 1998
ENSURING EVERY ARIZONA CHILD A FAIR START

1,263,404 children live in Arizona. In 1996, 296,088 (23.5 percent) were poor. The 1996 poverty level for a family of three was $12,516 a year ($1,043 a month). In the United States, 14,463,480 children (20.5 percent) were poor.
Arizona ranks 39th in the percentage of children in poverty. 1996
Between August 1996 and June 1999, Arizona’s welfare caseload dropped 48.1 percent from 169,442 to 87,894. In the United States, the welfare caseload dropped 44 percent from 12,241,489 to 6,773,700.
In FY 1998, 172,725 children in Arizona received food stamps. Food stamp participation in Arizona dropped by 25.7 percent from FY 1996 to FY 1998. Nationally 10,518,978 children received food stamps in 1998, a 20.2 percent decline from FY 1996.
In Arizona, the maximum monthly cash assistance benefit for a family of three is $347. Nationally, the median state’s maximum monthly cash assistance benefit for a family of three is $379. January 1998
In Arizona, there were 142,839 participants in the Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in FY 1999. Nationally, WIC had 7,086,646 participants in FY 1999.
440,103 Arizona children participated in the School Lunch Program in FY 1999. Nationally, 26,470,702 children participated in FY 1999.
133,393 Arizona children participated in the School Breakfast Program in FY 1999. Nationally, 7,155,006 children participated in FY 1999.
There were 50,462 Arizona participants in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in FY 1999. Nationally, there were 2,623,914 participants in FY 1999.
There were 23,319 Arizona children in the Summer Food Program in FY 1999. Nationally, there were 2,188,779 participants in FY 1999.
ENSURING EVERY ARIZONA CHILD A SAFE START

In Arizona, in 1997, there were 117 total firearm deaths of children and teens, including 52 suicides; 53 homicides; 5 accidents; and 7 of unknown intent. Nationally, in 1997, there were 4,205 total firearm deaths of children and teens, including 1,262 suicides; 2,562 homicides; 306 accidents; and 75 of unknown intent.
Arizona has no Child Access Prevention (CAP) Law and has no Trigger Lock Law.
In Arizona, in 1998, 8,983 children were victims of abuse and neglect, a 62.9 percent decrease since 1990; 69.8 percent of these were victims of neglect.
In Arizona, the proportion of minorities in the juvenile population is 43 percent, but the proportion of minority juveniles within public juvenile detention centers and public detention centers is 63 percent. Nationally, in 1997, minorities comprised 34 percent of the juvenile population, yet account for 67 percent of those within public juvenile detention centers and public detention centers. 1997
EDUCATION IN ARIZONA

86 percent of reading classes have more than 20 pupils. Nationally, 78 percent of reading classes have more than 20 pupils. 1998
78 percent of 4th graders read below the proficient level. Nationally, 71 percent of 4th graders read below the proficient level. 1998
There are 19.7 pupils for every teacher, compared to a national average of 17.1 pupils per teacher. 1996
24.1 percent of Science teachers, 39.2 percent of Math teachers, and 27.7 percent of English teachers in the public school system never received a major or minor degree in those subjects. Nationally, 21.8 percent of Science teachers, 20.3 percent of Math teachers, and 19.3 percent of English teachers in the public school system lack a major or minor degree in those subjects. 1993-1994
Arizona’s high school completion rate is 82.7 percent, compared with a national rate of 85.8 percent. 1995-1997
In the academic year 1995-1996, Arizona spent $4,476 per pupil, which ranked 48th in the country for total expenditures per pupil. (New Jersey ranked 1st with $9,361 for total expenditures per pupil.) 1995-1996
ARIZONA'S AVAILABLE FUNDS

Arizona’s total state budget balance for FY 1999 was $255.0 million.
The available tobacco settlement money in Arizona in 2000 is $94.5 million; the total tobacco settlement money through 2025 is $2.9 billion.
As of June 2000, Arizona had an estimated $77.6 million unspent Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) funds from its FY 1998 allotment.
In Arizona, there are no unobligated (uncommitted) TANF funds for FY 1997 through FY 1999.
EVERY MOMENT IN ARIZONA

Moments for Arizona Children

Every 25 minutes a baby was born into poverty.
Every 18 minutes a baby was born to an unmarried mother.
Every 47 minutes a baby was born to a teenage mother.
Every 2 hours a baby was born to a mother receiving late or no prenatal care.
Every 2 hours a baby was born at low birthweight.
Every 16 hours a baby died during the first year of life.
Every 2 minutes a public school student was suspended from school.
Every 39 minutes a public school student was corporally punished in school.
Every 22 minutes a child was reported abused or neglected.
Every day a child or youth dies by accident.
Every 2 days a child or youth died in an auto accident.
Every 4 days a child or youth was murdered.
Every 6 days a child or youth committed suicide.


Organization that manages corporate PC donations....http://www.cristina.org/about.html
What are the Special Benefits to Corporations for Donations of Inventory?
Under IRS Section 170(e)(3), corporations which donate inventory (i.e. Property sold in the normal course of business) to certain charitable organizations, such as NCF, may receive an additional tax benefit. Section 170(e)(3) provides a deduction for corporate contributions of inventory as much as twice the donor's adjusted basis in the property.
For this benefit to apply, inventory must be donated to a public charity (such as NCF) that will use the property for the benefit of the ill, the needy or minor children.

The charitable deduction for contributions of inventory (from a C corporation) will be the total of the donor's tax basis in the donated inventory plus one-half of the difference between the inventory tax basis and its fair market value. This is limited to 200% of the inventory tax basis plus any incidental costs (i.e., shipping, warehousing) associated with donating the inventory. Consult your tax advisor for consideration of this option.

GlaxoSmithKline
http://www.gsk.com/
GlaxoSmithKline, one of the largest pharmaceutical
companies in the world, supports projects that are
innovative, sustainable, and produce tangible results in
communities where it has a presence. The company's current
initiatives include a multisectoral HIV/AIDS collaboration
with four other pharmaceutical companies (Boehringer
Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Hoffman La Roche, and
Merck) and five international agencies (UNAIDS, UNICEF,
UNFPA, the World Bank, and the World Health Organisation)
under the auspices of the International Partnership
Against AIDS in Africa initiative (IPAA); a Global
Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (also known as
elephantiasis); Action TB, a coordinated research program
aimed at finding new targets for anti-TB therapies and
identifying novel vaccine candidates; and a controlled
donation programme for Malarone, an anti-malarial medicine.
Eli Lilly pharmaceuticals (foundation)

Monday, June 25, 2001

Dreamweaver UltradeveloperA dream is a wish your heart makes :) Can NOT afford it... but sure nice to drool.
I have been cleaning out my work area (I have a neat new filing cabinet) and tossing around ideas... not much new
hello, helloASKMI development